We’ve been fatally distracted from this blog by our Other Lives, but someone (thank you JedO) just told us about a little something  on Wiki we had to pass on.

Of course  Lewis Carroll’s  Wikipedia   page is prone to outbursts of Tourette’s at the best of times, with whole sections being replaced with pithy legends such as ‘he was a wanker‘, and  ‘his family were all donuts‘ ,  but here’s a recent addition a little more literate that doesn’t seem to be aiming at Absurdism, but still has me slightly bewildered:

Edward Wakeling, editor of the 10-volume “Lewis Carroll’s Diaries” has always maintained that there is no “myth” and Jenny Woolf, while agreeing that Carroll’s image has been comprehensively misrepresented in the past, believes that this can be attributed to Carroll’s own behaviour and in particular his tendency to self-caricature in later life

Okay.  Couple of things to ponder –

1. Edward Wakeling does not maintain there is  ‘no myth’, in fact he  has a link on his own  website entitled ‘Myths About Lewis Carroll’, with a  long list of  said myths, many of which are identical with those we examine.

2. Anyone have any idea  what the difference is between a life that is mythic and one that has been ‘comprehensively misrepresented’? Or what “this can be attributed to Carroll’s own behaviour and in particular his tendency to self-caricature in later lifeactually means?  That  poor Carroll was responsible for all the lies and nonsense said about him  for a hundred years and  more after his death? And that means, somehow (how?) that there’s no myth? Just a ‘comprehensive misrepresentation’ that is all Carroll’s own fault?

Correct me if I’m wrong but isn’t this semantic gibberish?

We have no idea who wrote this, but we think Mr W and Ms W should probably be informed in case they want to make changes.